Bloodhound LSR reaches final build phase

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The Bloodhound LSR has entered the final phase of its build program as the UK-based team prepares to head to South Africa to put the vehicle through a series of high-speed shakedowns on the vast Hakskeenpan desert, Northern Cape.

The test will entail 13 runs, building speed in 80km/h (50mph) increments between mid-October and mid-November, culminating in speeds of over 800km/h (500mph).

Powering the machine is an EJ200 jet engine. Produced by Rolls-Royce, the engine, which is normally found on the Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jet, creates 90kN of thrust, equivalent to approximately 54,000 thrust horsepower.

The jet engine will be aided by a monopropellant rocket system, adding extra thrust when the Bloodhound LSR car attempts to break the land speed record.

Prior to departure, one of the final installation checks of the car’s state-of-the-art engine is to dry crank it, checking all the systems are correct and working perfectly. This involves running through the startup sequence and turning it over with no fuel or ignition.

A dry crank test is a crucial stage of the pre-testing program as it confirms the engine and all its ancillary systems, fuel and electrics are correctly installed and ready to fire up once the car is in the full system test, confirming the engine can be started.

“Transforming Bloodhound from a runway spec car to one capable of reaching speeds in the transonic range on the desert racetrack has been no small task,” said Ian Warhurst, Bloodhound CEO. “After many years in preparation, we can’t wait to get out to the Hakskeenpan and let Bloodhound off the leash to see just how it performs.”

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Sam joined the UKi Media & Events automotive team in 2017, having recently graduated from the University of Brighton with a degree in journalism. For the newest addition to the editorial team, stepping into the assistant editor position signalled the start of a career in the subject he studied. In addition to his work on UKi’s automotive titles, Sam also contributes to Stadia, writing content for the magazine and website.

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