Team Porsche unveils 919’s V4 engine


Four-time Professional MotorSport World Expo Awards winner, Team Porsche has unveiled images of its 2015 WEC title-winning V4 IC engine for the first time

Porsche has revealed images for the first time of the powertrain from its World Endurance Championship racecar, the 919 Hybrid.

First introduced in 2014, the package won the overall drivers’ and manufacturers’ WEC titles and took a one-two at the Le Mans 24 Hours.

The turbocharged four-cylinder combustion engine with exhaust energy recovery system powering the rear wheels was mated up with an electric motor using the latest li-ion battery technology to power the front wheels.

The German OEM says that the engine is the most efficient it makes, which means that it was able to transfer knowledge from its racing activities when putting together the new flat-four engine in its 718 Boxster road car, taking inspiration from the 919 Hybrid ICE’s interspace between the cylinders, short stroke and central direct fuel injection.

The compact four-cylinder turbocharged idea was also key. Alexander Hitzinger, the technical director responsible for the 919, said: “Right from the beginning we had a brave concept, but it was also the right concept. This is paying off now.” As with every Porsche, the 919 Hybrid is being developed in Weissach at Porsche’s research and development center. Especially when it comes to the powertrain, Hitzinger’s crew works very closely with the engineers from production cars. “They support us significantly in the in the areas of combustion development and fuel-mixture generation,” he added.

The one element of the 919 Hybrid powertrain that isn’t similar to Porsche’s road cars is the V angle on the cylinders – its 90-degree layout is a far cry from the 718 Boxster’s 180 degrees.

Porsche says that the WEC gives engineers a great degree of freedom in terms of the hybrid drive concepts that may be employed. The teams can choose between diesel and petrol engines, naturally aspirated or turbocharged engines, various displacements, and one or two energy recovery systems.

This set-up puts the focus on innovations that will have a huge impact on future production sports cars – and this was the main reason why Porsche says it decided to return to the world of top level motor racing.

“Independently from our sporting targets, our most important task is to gather know-how for Porsche for future technologies,” added Fritz Enzinger, head of LMP1 activities at Porsche. “The WEC’s unique efficiency regulations, with the huge technical freedom, is the right platform for the company to develop and test innovations for road going sports cars.”

With the 2016 season about to begin, the company will no doubt be hoping to keep momentum from its recent run of success.


About Author


John joined UKi Media & Events in 2012 and has worked across a range of B2B titles within the company's automotive portfolio. Prior to joining the company, John worked for leading automotive design website, Car Design News. Currently editor of Engine Technology International, Professional MotorSport World, Professional MotorSport Circuit, and Transmission Technology International, John co-ordinates the day-the-day operations of each magazine, from commissioning and writing to editing and signing-off, as well managing web and social media content. Aside from the magazines, John also serves as chairman of the annual Professional MotorSport World Awards.

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